Friday, April 24, 2015

in the a "lot more sustainable" department

A needful voice in the mix, just ripples in a pond, and a question we should all be asking...

Maybe boatbuilders should pay attention...


SURFBOARDS FOR A SHARED PLANET from erik derman on Vimeo.

Listening to Zella Day

So it goes...

Thursday, April 23, 2015

a matter of seaworthiness...

In the "hardly surprising" department, this really says a lot, and some needful reading...

I was recently looking at the study plans for one of Reuel Parker's boats, a scow as it happens, and there was a comment by Reuel that got me thinking...

"Scows are not considered seaworthy types, although they can make coastal trips and island passages." 

The thing about seaworthiness is it's a pretty fluid concept at best and, in most cases, something of a gray area being dependant on many factors. Which means that one person's seaworthy vessel may seem like a floating death trap to another. Having crossed seas with an internally ballasted shoal draft sharpie that drew eighteen inches, I used to have this pointed out to me on a regular basis...

That said, scows of the traditional sort are not seaworthy in the same sense as a keel boat with external ballast. For starters internal ballast is not very good at righting a fully capsized hull and if that's going to be your main criteria of seaworthiness a scow may actually seem somewhat lacking...

Just like a modern catamaran. 

Seriously, if you applied the same thought process that makes a scow unseaworthy to just about any production cat currently being built today you'd have to come to the same conclusion... Catamarans are unseaworthy.

You might want to think about that for a moment or two...

Which does not mean that I think all modern production catamarans are unseaworthy (just some) or that a traditional scow is either. Just that they are both different in ways you should be aware of.

Like I said before, seaworthiness is a pretty slippery notion and depends much more on the person sailing a boat rather than the actual design. Sailing a traditional scow has a lot more in common with sailing a catamaran than it does with an externally ballasted monohull...

So, would I consider sailing Reuel Parker's scow across an ocean?

Sure I would. Then again, before I did I'd sail it a lot, practice deploying a parachute sea anchor/heavy weather tactics, and sort out the best way to hove to with the board up because I'm not real keen on surprises further offshore than I care to swim towards land. Of course, anybody considering a trans-oceanic passage would do the same no matter what sort of boat they intended to cross with.. 

Right?

Listening to She & Him

So it goes...

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

An Earth Day link...

Something happening here, a certain lack of logic, and this should kick start your Spidey sense...

Hey, it's Earth Day. If you're looking for a short, insightful, and great post on the subject, I highly recommend today's post from Just an Earth-Bound Misfit which mirrors my thoughts 100%.

You're still here?

Listening to Lilly Hiatt

So it goes...



Tuesday, April 21, 2015

So, if a guy tells you your chosen rig sucks why listen to him about your keel?

Hitting the nail right smack dab on the head, thumbs on the scales of justice, and an apt comment...

There's a discussion over at the JRA forum discussing a possible junk rig sailboat design that I find rather irksome but it's a great reminder about how there is so much bad information floating around about how boats work.

Especially where shoal draft, forms of ballast, and lateral resistance are concerned...

I think what bothers me is junk rig advocates should know full well how much misinformation there is about their rig of choice and so it would seem they'd be a lot more cynical/skeptical about other areas of boat design or suchlike.

Which, I suspect, is why the junk rig is nowhere near as successful as it could be. They're not designing junk rig sailboats but adapting junk rigs to existing Bahamian sloop thinking and there's a difference.

A big difference...

Listening to Ben E. King

So it goes...

Monday, April 20, 2015

Hey, here's a thought...

A good run, a good observation, and a very good/apt point being made...

I need to build another dinghy in the not-too-distant-future and perusing all of the dinghy plan pimpage out there no one portrays their dinghies actually being used in normal dinghy situations.

What I see instead are one-occupant dinghies being rowed or motored in flat calm conditions with no passengers and no load. Seems to me, if you wanted to give a real cruising perspective to the mix, what I should be seeing is a guy rowing against a two-foot chop with ten knots of wind. Oh yeah, there should also be one or two passengers, a couple of full jerry cans, and forty pounds of groceries...

Listening to some Rolling Stones covers

So it goes...

Sunday, April 19, 2015

a pretty cool project...

A show you might want to watch, some not so good news, and since the NRA is so big on cheer leading indiscriminate gun ownership maybe they'd like to pick up the tab for gun violence in the US of A...



Listening to Mina Tindle

So it goes...



Saturday, April 18, 2015

In aid of less tyro glasswork...

Nope no global warming/climate change anywhere on the third rock, about that state sanctioned murder thang, and yet another reason I don't read Facebook...

Fiberglass Hawaii has an excellent glassing tutorial and profile of Jack Reeves that is well worth watching. Here's part 1...



There's more on their Composite Corner blog and whether you're glassing a surfboard, dinghy, or a full on cruising boat the skills are pretty much the same...

Listening to some Tears for Fears covers

So it goes...


Friday, April 17, 2015

Some stuff to think about...

A question I keep asking myself, don't you love it when right wingers do their math, and in the "Better Conditions = Happier Workers = Higher Profits" department ( FYI: If you wear clothing with sailing company logos chances are it was sewn in a sweat shop)...



Listening to Françoise Hardy

So it goes...

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Ego and money...

Not good at all, Percy Sledge RIP, and about connecting those dots...

Since we were speaking about sailboat races yesterday...

Yacht racing is mainly about two things, neither of which really have anything to do with sailing at all. The bottom line is it's really just ego and money. Or, to put it in other words, it's rich men behaving badly and people profiting from rich men behaving badly.

So, forgive me if I'm not going to get all excited by the new STAR (Sailing the Arctic Race) green-washed vaporware circus coming down the pike...

That said, if you want to follow and support a real race for real people of an adventuresome bent, check out the R2AK. It will be a whole lot more interesting and, if successful, could be the very model of the sort of boat racing a lot of us could get behind and support.

Listening to the forever great Percy Sledge

So it goes...

Tuesday, April 14, 2015