Monday, February 08, 2016

Regarding risk tolerance in a risky business..

An uplifting story (of sorts) from Texas, a famous ships cat, and in the "unable to organize a pissup in a brewery" department...

While not about sailing or cruising as such, Dick Dorworth has written a great piece regarding risk tolerance that anyone sailing or cruising should take the time to read.

You're still here?

Listening to Tindersticks

So it goes...

Sunday, February 07, 2016

L.I.T. and a new use for the ubiquitous boat bucket...

Erin Brockovich making sense, stuff you need to know, and, sadly, the great Dan Hicks is no longer with us...

OK, I'll be the first to admit I suffer from a bad case of L.I.T. (Limited Imbecile Tolerance) and it most often manifests itself when anchors and the process of anchoring are involved.

So, yet another cunning plan in the ever fruitless saga of my finding even more sordid and heinous ways to keep people from anchoring on top of me...

Did you know that Remo just came out with a very boat friendly drum head?



Even better, I'm pretty sure that if you buy a half-dozen you get a pretty deep discount!

Listening to Dan Hicks

So it goes...

Saturday, February 06, 2016

Some stuff worth checking out...

10% well spent, a good reason to vote for Bernie, and why you may want to steer clear of Venezuela (and environs) for the foreseeable future...

The blogosphere is a big place and, while a lot of folks have gone over to Facebook and Twitter, blogs as a source of boat content, are still a great resource and I keep finding great ones all the time.

Sailing Dawn Treader is just such a blog. Great in-depth content of a practical sort. I like what they're doing with their boat and there are a lot of good ideas that anyone could adapt. What's not to love?

Gougeon 32 Refit is another blog with some great info coming down the pike. I've always liked the Gougeon 32 catamaran and as Russel Brown really knows his way around multihulls, construction, and composites, having an up close and personal seat to Russel's process of pimping out a G32 is just plain cool with a cherry on top.

The Whiskey Plank is Reuel Parker expounding on a great many things and all of them interesting. Made better by the fact that Parker tends to think about things from a slightly different perspective so just that little bit different even when he's writing about the same old same. Not only do I have his blog bookmarked but I save just about everything he writes regarding design and construction because I know I'll need them some day..

Listening to Sierra Hull

So it goes...

Friday, February 05, 2016

Decisions, decisions...

Scary, something about the Zika virus, and in the "highly effective pathogens" department...

I thought long and hard yesterday about buying a new to me boat. Four feet longer and with two and a half feet more beam it would have over twice the room of "So It Goes".

Room for a couple more twelve-strings...

Of course, a bigger boat would have to earn its keep and a big chunk of that added space and load carrying ability would have to be devoted to that end. My initial thought would be a dedicated work space in the forepeak area and some dedicated cargo space.

Still pondering about that...

In the meantime, we have a boat more or less drifting loose off our stern since its mooring chain broke in some gusty winds Wednesday night.

Always something or other...

Listening to Bill Mallonee & Vigilantes of Love

So it goes... 

Wednesday, February 03, 2016

an interesting concept...

Some stuff you really need to know, just one reason (of many) why unions are a goodly thing, and an apt observation...

How about something interesting via Pecha Kucha?







More information on the Foldaway mast can be found at the Balpha Mast website.


Listening to Gallows Bound

So it goes...

Monday, February 01, 2016

2300...

A very scary number, an extremely dangerous precedent, and a world that never was to be...

As it happens, I noticed this morning when I started this post that it's number 2300. I mention this because I usually write these posts while having my second cup of coffee in the morning which equates to a whole lot of coffee consumed while writing Boat Bits.

That's somewhere close to 144 gallons of the stuff in fact. Not bragging or anything but just simply pointing out a fairly important part of what makes Boat Bits happen.

Caffeine, lots and lots of caffeine.

So, with that fact in mind, I'd like to dedicate today's post to my personal drug of choice... Moose Drool.

Listening to Raphael and Jean-Louis Aubert

So it goes...

Sunday, January 31, 2016

A new POP design...

A very depressing business model, some trickle-down kleptocracy, and Fatty Goodlander wrote the best thing I've read in a sailing magazine in the last couple of years (so you might want to check it out)...

Like a lot of people I've been hoping that Roberto Barros and his crew would be working on a larger version of the POP 25 boat in plywood.

That said, thay have worked up a 32-foot POP in aluminum (at least one is already under construction) and, just recently, unveiled a 28-foot version also in aluminum...







I don't think I need to tell you that this is one very cool home-buildable boat. Lots more information on the POP 28 here.

Still waiting on a reasonable facsimile of the POP 28/32 in plywood though...

Listening to the Mother Hips

So it goes...

Saturday, January 30, 2016

But seriously...

Regarding rising mortality rates for some, a question about a quarter billion dollars in cash, and a good point being made...

So, yesterday I had a video of Robin Knox Johnson being just a bit pissy on the antics of Captain Snafu and the Fubar Kid which resulted in no small amount of mail as a result.

Surprising mail as it happens...

Most of it being of the "well accidents happen, stuff breaks, and they're newbies so no reason to be so hard on these guys" sort.

Obviously some folks have not been paying attention...

Then again maybe they have and are simply too dense to understand just how dangerous these idiots are both to themselves and, mostly, to those who go to sea to rescue sailors in peril.

Then there's the other thing... Sailing for Americans is pretty lax on rules, safety requirements, and licensing. A situation I heartily approve of as it requires, to a great extent, that we as sailors take responsibility for our own safety and actions. Not all countries take that viewpoint but because the US of A is who it is, they allow us to sail their waters without a lot of red tape and onerous licensing requirements. This, of course, could change.

Captain Snafu and the Fubar Kid are just the sort of poster boys that will have politicians in a variety of countries falling all over themselves to write new laws regarding how foreign sailboats are allowed in, what hoops their crews will have to jump through to be deemed acceptable, and, the icing on the cake, a whole new plethora of fees to support a whole new bureacracy. Sort of a politicians wet dream is it not?

So, maybe it's just me, but the next time I sail to the UK, France, Turkey, Argentina, Tahiti, or wherever-the-fuck I really do not want to have to get a license to drive my boat in their waters or post a million-dollar rescue bond to prove that I actually have a clue how to sail a boat, have a modicum of common sense, and that, in the event of needing rescue, I will be able to pay for the full cost of the rescue and any damages or injuries caused to those rescuing me.

Just think about that scenario for a few minutes.

Oh yeah, for those who are thinking to themselves that their ASA 104 Bareboat Certification card that came in a box of Cracker Jacks will past muster, you might also be interested in a metal tower I have for sale in Paris...

Listening to some Marty Balin covers

So it goes...

Friday, January 29, 2016

More on Captain Snafu and his sidekick the Fubar Kid...

A noteworthy rant, some interesting facts, something about the cost of things, and Paul Kantner is no longer with us...

Robin Knox Johnson says something needful.



Listening to the Jefferson Airplane

So it goes...

Thursday, January 28, 2016

a quick thought...

An important question, double standard justice, and just the same old same Florida anchoring BS...

So, Dave Z and I have been having a discussion on various subjects and something he said got me thinking about boats, the internet, and how they fit together.

If I say something like...

You can do something.

It does not mean that I think you should. I'm simply pointing out that something is possible. 

If I were to point out that a self-built dinghy that only requires oars or a small outboard is a much more economical choice than a big RIB with a fifteen HP or larger outboard, I'm in no way saying you should have a small rowing dinghy but simply pointing out a simple economical fact of the difference between those two choices.

Part of the reason I'm so attracted to the sailing/cruising gig is simply that you can pretty much do what you want as we're joyfully unfettered for the most part. Sadly, there seems more and more pressure to constrain and quash that freedom.

Truth be told, I'd really hate to be part of that menace that tells people they have to do something a certain way and be part of the pressure that forces people to conform and become sheep.

Choice is cool but it comes at a cost. Just the other day while I rowed past a boat picking up its anchor the guy on the foredeck called out to us with a clever (well, at least he thought it was) jibe concerning rowing and Lin & Larry Pardey. I'm sure he felt all kinds of superior having put me in my place but it did not bother me to the point that I'd go out and buy a 12-foot RIB with a 35HP outboard to better fit in because of what some dork thinks.

Which is not to say there was not a certain amount of irritation but that's just the cost of doing business your way instead of following the herd.

Listening to David Bowie cover John Lennon

So it goes...